Jargon Begone!

The following jargon have been provided by the community. If you would like to contribute a jargon please click on the Add to Jargon Begone! button.

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What jargon term annoys you the most? Why?
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For instance, if your blinds have severe discolouration that does not go away
with maintenance, or when the slats of your blinds have
holes or harm.

Dyspnea

I can't even work out how to say it

Game Changer

Over used.

Stand Up Meeting

Some of us can't stand up

"Effectuate". As in: "We need to effectuate a change".

Used by jargonists who seem to feel that simple, precise terminology is too revealing of their own simplicity.

"Normalcy"

Whatever happened to good old "normality" ?

"Unarrive". As in: "Pt has unarrived clinic."

Believe it or not, this piece of astonishingly inept Americlish has begun to enter usage in GP clinic admin software, no doubt spurred on by the equally American notion of "Unfriending" people on Facebook. Please don't allow it to take hold here!

integumentary

such a freaking long word, a tongue twister meaning skin

Acopic (A-Cope-Ick)

Meaning "Not coping, not tolerating well". Very frustrating because it makes a negative assumption about the patient that they are only presenting due to difficulty coping and not because they are actually unwell or needing assistance. It labels the patient before they can be thoroughly assessed and its stigmatising them to be the "anxious type" or "hyperchondriac".

Do some heavy lifting

Pompous and self-indulgent

"Lean in"

Don't we address / discuss / come together to find solutions - I'm over leaning in!!

Where the rubber meets the road

Consultant speak. Blah

Take it offline

It reeks of a person on a power trip

"If you need more information Reach Out" - whaaaat!!!!

What happened to, "if you need more information, please contact me/us" or "if you need further assistance, please contact me/us". What's with this "reach out" nonsense!

It's not specifically a jargon term that annoys me, it's the increased use of acronyms.

What the heck do some of these acronyms mean!!!!! STOP using acronyms that often only relate to your field/area of work, just speak plain English so we know what you mean and we can stop pretending we know what you mean.

To talk up something (e.g. in sales)

You cannot translate that without at least using 5 more other words in Languages Other Than English.

Elderly primigravida

Just say 'older first-time mum' please! Not only will your patients know what you are talking about, they also won't have to deal with the shock of being called 'elderly' in their late-30s.

evidence-based practice

because it means nothing to clients who just want a service

Capacity Building

Because capacity means take more on, not learn more skills.

Town hall meeting

Yep! It's the latest management jargon in the community sector imported from the USA. Initially we all thought the meeting was being held in a town hall - which was super confusing as... what's the occasion, it's not book launch or concert. You get the gist! Turns out it's just a jargonistic term from management for a ...... staff meeting. Yep boring old staff meeting. Hilarious.

What jargon term annoys you the most? Why?
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Why should I pledge?

 

6 out of 10 of people in Australia have low health literacy.

Many Australians have trouble understanding and using information provided by organisations. They also have trouble navigating complicated systems like healthcare services.

When we use jargon, technical terms or acronyms, it is hard for people with low health literacy to understand and use information.

 Pledge and take part in activities at your workplace. Make it easy for people with low health literacy to get better information and outcomes from services they use.

Drop the Jargon

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Pledge to Drop the Jargon

  • Use plain language in all communication – with other staff and with clients
  • Not use acronyms
  • Explain medical and other technical terminology
  • Check that information has been understood by your clients
  • Work with a professional interpreter when your clients have low English proficiency
  • Politely point out when your colleagues use jargon